Governance Typology: A Consensus Classification of State-Local Health Department Relationships

Public health practitioners and researchers often refer to state public health systems as being centralized, decentralized, shared, or mixed. These categories refer to governance of the local public health units within the state and whether they operate under the authority of the state government, local government, shared state and local governance, or a mix of governance structures within the state. This article describes the development of an objective method of classifying states as centralized, decentralized, shared, or mixed. It also discusses some initial analyses that have been conducted to identify how public health resources and activities vary across states with different classifications.

Available online: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23023276

It is included in the CJS Resource Library under the categories listed below. Select a link to find other resources in that category.

  • Background / History: This article discusses the background of how public health systems have been categorized in the past.
  • Governance: The authors discuss differing governance structures for public health.
  • Research and Evaluation: The articles describes the development of an objective method of classifying state public health systems as centralized, decentralized, shared, or mixed.

 
This resource is also linked to the Roadmap. Select a link below to read more about each area.

  • Why? / Phase One: This article describes the need for an objective method of classifying state public health systems as centralized, decentralized, shared or mixed.
  • What? / Phase One: This article describes the development of an objective method of classifying state public health systems as centralized, decentralized, shared or mixed.
  • Governance / Phase Two: The authors discuss differing governance structures for public health.

 

Miet, M., Sellers, K., Kronstadt, J., Lawhorn, N., Brown, A., Liss-Levinson R., et. al. (2012). Governance typology: A consensus classification of state-local health department relationships. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 18(6), 520–528.