Kansas

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Background Information on Public Health Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing in Kansas

Kansas is served by a decentralized public health system where local governments retain authority over many decisions. There are 100 independent local health departments in the state that are led by local staff. There also are six state-run district offices. For information about the legal basis for cross-jurisdictional sharing in Kansas, read this document from the Network for Public Health Law. The Center’s Resource Library contains additional resources on cross-jurisdictional sharing in Kansas.


Examples of CJS Arrangements


 

Center for Sharing Public Health Services Grantees

American Heart Association
This grantee was part of the Center’s Small Grant Program.
The American Heart Association in Kansas is working on behalf of the four federally recognized Native American Tribes in the state—Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas, Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, and the Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska. The tribes are developing a data-sharing arrangement, and they are using a research project on tribal youths’ perception of health as the basis for the arrangement.

Additional Examples

Case Study: Public Health Shared Services: Northeast Kansas (NEK) Multi-County Health Department
Source: Kansas Health Institute
The Northeast Kansas (NEK) Multi-County Health Department is a collaboration between three rural counties: Atchison, Brown and Jackson. It operates as a single agency, but provides public health services in each county. It also operates a home health agency, which is located in the city of Hiawatha and serves all three counties. The arrangement allows the counties to share one administrator and one accountant between all four locations. The counties receive many benefits by offering public health services through this sharing arrangement, such as staffing efficiencies, a revenue stream from the home health agency (which contributes to the financial stability of the entire health department), and moral support among peers from different counties.

Case Study: Public Health Shared Services: Southeast Kansas (SEK) Multi-County Health Department
Source: Kansas Health Institute
The Southeast Kansas (SEK) Multi-County Health Department is a collaboration between four rural counties: Allen, Anderson, Bourbon and Woodson. It operates as a single agency, but provides public health services in each county. The arrangement allows the four counties to share one administrator, one accountant and one medical director between the four public health locations. The counties receive many benefits by offering public health services through this sharing arrangement, including efficiencies in administration, increased flexibility for staff members, and cooperation and moral support between counties.

Case Study: Exploration of Public Health Shared Services: Butler and Greenwood Counties
Source: Kansas Health Institute
This case study features two county health departments in Kansas that considered sharing a family planning program. Although the CJS arrangement did not move forward, some important lessons were learned as a result of the process.

Case Study: Public Health Shared Services: South Central Kansas Coalition for Public Health
Source: Kansas Health Institute
Seven rural counties–Barber, Comanche, Edwards, Harper, Kingman, Kiowa and Pratt–collaborate through the South Central Kansas Coalition for Public Health (SKCPH). While each county has its own health department, they work together through the SKCPH to offer three shared public health programs in the region: family planning, emergency preparedness and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Each program is offered in all seven counties, but only one county must provide the administrative oversight for each program. This reduces the administrative burden on the other health departments while allowing the staff coordinating the program to become specialists in each program area. The counties and health departments receive many benefits through the sharing arrangement, such as more efficient administration of the shared programs and increased collaboration and knowledge transfer between the counties.


Note: This is not a complete list of all CJS arrangements in the state. If you have examples to submit, please contact us at phsharing@khi.org.