Case Study: Public Health Shared Services: South Central Kansas Coalition for Public Health

Seven rural counties–Barber, Comanche, Edwards, Harper, Kingman, Kiowa and Pratt–collaborate through the South Central Kansas Coalition for Public Health (SKCPH). While each county has its own health department, they work together through the SKCPH to offer three shared public health programs in the region: family planning, emergency preparedness and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Each program is offered in all seven counties, but only one county must provide the administrative oversight for each program. This reduces the administrative burden on the other health departments while allowing the staff coordinating the program to become specialists in each program area. The counties and health departments receive many benefits through the sharing arrangement, such as more efficient administration of the shared programs and increased collaboration and knowledge transfer between the counties.

Available online: http://www.khi.org/assets/uploads/news/13840/sckphs_casestudy.pdf

It is included in the CJS Resource Library under the categories listed below. Select a link to find other resources in that category.

  • Background / History: The counties have a long history of public health sharing, dating back to the formation of their health departments over 40 years ago.
  • Governance: It is governed by an executive board appointed by county commissioners. The board currently consists of four people from each county: one health care provider, one county commissioner, one health care consumer and one member-at-large. The board has the authority to add and discontinue coalition programs as needed.
  • Regionalization: Seven rural counties have individual public health departments that are agencies within each county’s government. They collaborate to share services through a quasi-governmental entity called the South Central Kansas Coalition for Public Health.

 
This resource is also linked to the Roadmap. Select a link below to read more about each area.

  • Why? / Phase One: Individual counties did not have enough residents to meet the state requirements for offering programs such as the federal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).
  • Governance / Phase Two: It is governed by an executive board appointed by county commissioners. The board currently consists of four people from each county: one health care provider, one county commissioner, one health care consumer and one member-at-large. The board has the authority to add and discontinue coalition programs as needed.
  • Change Management / Phase Two: Whenever there is a change in leadership, personality differences can cause friction. The coalition provides an enduring structure that withstands difficulties brought by change.
  • Communications and Change Management / Phase Three: Because of the partnership, commissioners are more likely to collaborate with those from other counties to build solutions to shared challenges.