Case Study: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Cross‐Jurisdictional Services Project, Southwest Washington: 2014‐2015

This case study examines the Center’s demonstration site in Southwest Washington. The participants were seeking to develop a governance structure that could be used for a wide variety of projects and services. After eight meetings, the team ultimately determined that further pursuit of the original goal would not be productive. This case study is intended to understand how the effort progressed, factors that hindered the desired progress, and lessons that could inform other jurisdictions interested in similar pursuits.

Available online: http://phsharing.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/CaseStudy_SW_Washington.pdf

It is included in the CJS Resource Library under the categories listed below. Select a link to find other resources in that category.

  • Change Management: Through the case study development process, it became clear that participants approached this effort from different philosophical approaches. These differing philosophies, although not clearly stated during the project, appear to be at the heart of some of the difficulties experienced by the group.
  • Communications: Participants agreed that trust among the participants was undermined early in the project due to the lack of agreement and communication about hiring of a new health officer for the region. Trust was damaged when participants did not communicate about expectations and role of a shared, regional health officer.

 
This resource is also linked to the Roadmap. Select a link below to read more about each area.

  • What? / Phase One: The consultant observed that participants did not agree on the project goals. While meeting agendas contained stated meeting and project objectives, they were not reflected in any of the meeting notes reviewed.
  • Communications / Phase Two: Participants agreed that trust among the participants was undermined early in the project due to the lack of agreement and communication about hiring of a new health officer for the region. Trust was damaged when participants did not communicate about expectations and role of a shared, regional health officer.
  • Change Management / Phase Two: Through the case study development process, it became clear that participants approached this effort from different philosophical approaches. These differing philosophies, although not clearly stated during the project, appear to be at the heart of some of the difficulties experienced by the group.