Report–Consolidation of Local Health Departments in Ohio: Motivations and Impacts

This policy brief reviews motivations and impacts for consolidation of local public health departments in Ohio. It indicates that health departments often seek to save money and improve services through consolidation, and that overall city government factors such as budget deficits and the structure of the city leadership are influential in promoting consolidations.

Available online (pdf): http://du1ux2871uqvu.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/file/Consolidation%20of%20Local%20Health%20Departments%20in%20Ohio.pdf

It is included in the CJS Resource Library under the categories listed below. Select a link to find other resources in that category.

  • Consolidation: Interviewees reported that their consolidations have been successful in achieving their fiscal and service goals more than 90 percent of the time.
  • Fiscal and Service Issues: Research results indicate that consolidation is associated with a significant reduction in per capita total expenditures and that the consolidations did not lead to increases in the tax burden for public health services on the county jurisdictions.
  • Governance: This study examines implications of consolidation for local public health expenditures, workforce and service.
  • Research and Evaluation: Researchers used data obtained through interviews conducted with senior county health department officials and statistical analyses of administrative data.

 
This resource is also linked to the Roadmap. Select a link below to read more about each area.

  • Fiscal and Service Implications / Phase Two: Research results indicated that consolidation is associated with a significant reduction in per capita total expenditures and that the consolidations did not lead to increases in the tax burden for public health services on the county jurisdictions.
  • Governance / Phase Two: This study examines implications of consolidation for local public health expenditures, workforce and service.
  • Monitoring and Improving / Phase Three: Ongoing monitoring is needed but initial research results suggest that while the consolidations that occurred did not end up costing township and municipal residents within the county jurisdictions more money, the consolidations do not appear to have resulted in reduced taxes for public health services either.

 

Stefanak, M., Filla, J., Hoornbeek, J., & Morris, M. (2013). Policy Brief – Local Health Department Consolidation in Ohio: Motivations and Impacts. Kent, OH: Center for Public Policy and Health, Kent State University (in cooperation with the Fay Boozman College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences).