Health Districts as Quality Improvement Collaboratives and Multijurisdictional Entities

This article demonstrates the utility of regionalization across traditional local geopolitical boundaries. An online survey tool and follow-up phone calls with key informants in health districts and county health departments in Georgia were used to assess the capacity of multicounty health districts to serve as “Quality Improvement Collaboratives” and support local health departments to meet accreditation standards.

Available online: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23023281

It is included in the CJS Resource Library under the categories listed below. Select a link to find other resources in that category.

  • Accreditation / Essential Services: This research was conducted to assess the capacity of multicounty health districts to serve as “Quality Improvement Collaboratives” and support local health departments to meet accreditation standards.
  • Quality Improvement: In response to the survey used for this research, key opinion leaders from both the rural and non-rural counties agreed that the multicounty health districts were important for providing essential services and supporting quality improvement collaboration.
  • Research and Evaluation: This study by the Georgia PBRN of Georgia health districts and county health departments demonstrated the utility of regionalization across traditional local geopolitical boundaries.

 
This resource is also linked to the Roadmap. Select a link below to read more about each area.

  • Monitoring and Improving / Phase Three: In response to the survey used for this research, key opinion leaders from both the rural and non-rural counties agreed that the multicounty health districts were important for providing essential services and supporting quality improvement collaboration.

 

Livingood, W., Marshall, N., Peden, A., Gonzalez, K., Shah, G. H., Alexander, D., et. al. (2012). Health districts as quality improvement collaboratives and multijurisdictional entities. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 18(6), 561–570.